Educational

Indigenous Knowledge in STEM Education

Speaker: 
Ron Eglash
Date: 
Fri, Mar 8, 2013
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Special Lecture
Abstract: 
Computing with Culture From fractals in African architecture to algorithms in First Nations beadwork, simulations of indigenous designs reveal complex concepts and practices that can be mapped onto analogous principles in math, science and computing. Applications for this work include outreach to K-12 students as well as contributions to sustainable development.
Ron Eglash
Dr Ron Eglash is an American cyberneticist, university professor, and author widely known for his work in the field of ethnomathematics, which aims to study the diverse relationships between math and culture.

Math Mania at the Middle School

Speaker: 
St Michaels University School
Date: 
Fri, Dec 7, 2012
Location: 
St Michaels University School, Victoria
Conference: 
Math Mania
Abstract: 
Mania over Math at St Michaels University School

Math Mania, a new event at SMUS, brought a crowd of students and parents to the Middle School to enjoy games and puzzles for all ages. Parents teamed up with their children to conquer equations and Senior School students shared their enthusiasm for mathematics with some of our younger community members.

For more information on Math Mania please visit the

Credit for this video belongs to St Michaels University School.

Small Number and the Basketball Tournament

Speaker: 
Veselin Jungic
Speaker: 
Mark Maclean
Speaker: 
Rena Sinclair
Date: 
Tue, May 1, 2012
Location: 
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
BIRS First Nations Math Education Workshop
Abstract: 
The mathematical context of the third story, Small Number and the Basketball Tournament, contains some basic principles of combinatorics. The plot of the story and the closing question are structured in a manner that allows the moderator to introduce the notion of permutations and combinations. Since the numbers used in the story are relatively small, this can be used to encourage the young audience to explore on their own. Mathematics is also present in the background. Small Number and his friends do mathematics after school in the Aboriginal Friendship Centre. He loves playing the game of Set and when he comes home his sister is just finishing her math homework. Small Number and his friend would like to participate in a big half-court tournament, and so on.
For more details see http://mathcatcher.irmacs.sfu.ca/content/small-number

Summer at the HUB Britiania Summer Camp

Speaker: 
Melania Alvarez
Date: 
Fri, Jul 1, 2011
Location: 
Britiannia Centre
Conference: 
Summer at the HUB
Abstract: 
PIMS was proud to support the 'Summer at the HUB' camp which took place in July-August 2011. Focus camps included Lego Simple Machines and Math, iPad Camp and Robo Meccano. Many thanks to Britannia Centre for providing this video.

Small Number and the Old Canoe (Squamish)

Speaker: 
Veselin Jungic
Speaker: 
Mark Maclean
Speaker: 
Rena Sinclair
Date: 
Sun, Nov 22, 2009
Location: 
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
BIRS First Nations Math Education Workshop
Abstract: 
N.B. This video is a translation into Squamish by T'naxwtn, Peter Jacobs of the Squamish Nation In Small Num­ber and the Old Canoe math­e­mat­ics is present through­out the story with the hope that this expe­ri­ence will make at least some mem­bers of our young audi­ence, with the moderator’s help, rec­og­nize more math­e­mat­ics around them in their every­day lives. We use terms like smooth, shape, oval, and sur­face, the math­e­mat­i­cal phrase­ol­ogy like, It must be at least a hun­dred years old, the artist skill­fully presents reflec­tion (sym­me­try) of trees in water, and so on. The idea behind this approach is to give the mod­er­a­tor a few open­ings to intro­duce or empha­size var­i­ous math­e­mat­i­cal objects, con­cepts, and ter­mi­nol­ogy. The short film is a lit­tle math sus­pense story and our ques­tion is related only to one part of it. The aim of the ques­tion is to lead to an intro­duc­tion at an intu­itive level of the con­cept of a func­tion and the essence of the prin­ci­ple of inclusion-exclusion as a count­ing tech­nique. The authors would also like to give their audi­ence an oppor­tu­nity to appre­ci­ate that in order to under­stand a math ques­tion, one often needs to read (or in this case, watch) a prob­lem more than once. For additional details see http://mathcatcher.irmacs.sfu.ca/story/small-number-and-old-canoe

Small Number and the Old Canoe

Speaker: 
Veselin Jungic
Speaker: 
Mark Maclean
Speaker: 
Rena Sinclair
Date: 
Sun, Nov 22, 2009
Location: 
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
BIRS First Nations Math Education Workshop
Abstract: 
In Small Num­ber and the Old Canoe math­e­mat­ics is present through­out the story with the hope that this expe­ri­ence will make at least some mem­bers of our young audi­ence, with the moderator’s help, rec­og­nize more math­e­mat­ics around them in their every­day lives. We use terms like smooth, shape, oval, and sur­face, the math­e­mat­i­cal phrase­ol­ogy like, It must be at least a hun­dred years old, the artist skill­fully presents reflec­tion (sym­me­try) of trees in water, and so on. The idea behind this approach is to give the mod­er­a­tor a few open­ings to intro­duce or empha­size var­i­ous math­e­mat­i­cal objects, con­cepts, and ter­mi­nol­ogy. The short film is a lit­tle math sus­pense story and our ques­tion is related only to one part of it. The aim of the ques­tion is to lead to an intro­duc­tion at an intu­itive level of the con­cept of a func­tion and the essence of the prin­ci­ple of inclusion-exclusion as a count­ing tech­nique. The authors would also like to give their audi­ence an oppor­tu­nity to appre­ci­ate that in order to under­stand a math ques­tion, one often needs to read (or in this case, watch) a prob­lem more than once. For additional details see http://mathcatcher.irmacs.sfu.ca/story/small-number-and-old-canoe

Small Number Counts to 100 (Cree)

Speaker: 
Veselin Jungic
Speaker: 
Mark Maclean
Speaker: 
Rena Sinclair
Date: 
Sun, Nov 22, 2009
Location: 
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
BIRS First Nations Math Education Workshop
Abstract: 
This short animation movie is a math education resource based on Aboriginal culture. For more information, visit: http://www.math.sfu.ca/~vjungic/SmallNumber.html This version of the video was recorded by Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn of the Pikani First Nation in Blackfoot. Special Thanks To: Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery Department of Mathematics, Simon Fraser University Pacific Institute For Mathematical Sciences Sean O'Reilly, Arcana Studios The IRMACS Centre, Simon Fraser University

As Geometry is Lost - What Connections are Lost? What Reasoning is Lost? What Students are Lost? Does it Matter?

Speaker: 
Walter Whitley
Date: 
Fri, Apr 29, 2011
Location: 
SFU Harbour Center
Location: 
PIMS, Simon Fraser University
Conference: 
Changing the Culture 2011
Abstract: 
In a North American curriculum preoccupied with getting to calculus, we witness an erosion of geometric content and practice in high school. What remains is often detached from "making sense of the world", and from reasoning (beyond axiomatic work in University). We see the essential role of geometry in science, engineering, computer graphics and in solving core problems in applications put aside when revising math curriculum. A second feature is that most graduates with mathematics degrees are not aware of these rich connections for geometry. We will present some samples of: what we know about early childhood geometry.; and then of the critical role of geometry and geometric reasoning in work in multiple fields outside of mathematics. With a perspective from "modern geometry", we note the critical role of transformations, symmetries and invariance in many fields, including mathematics beyond geometry. With these bookends of school mathematics in mind, we consider some key issues in schools, such as which students are lost when the bridge of geometry is not there to carry them through (caught in endless algebra) and possible connections other subjects. We also consider the loss within these other disciplines. We will present some sample investigations and reasoning which can be supported by a broader more inclusive set of practices and which pays attention to geometric features and reasoning in various contexts. In particular, we illustrate the use of dynamic geometry investigations, hands on investigations and reflections, and making connections to deeper parts of the rest of mathematics and science.

Changing the Culture of Homework

Speaker: 
Justin Grey
Speaker: 
Jamie Mulholand
Date: 
Fri, Apr 29, 2011
Location: 
SFU Harbour Center
Location: 
PIMS, Simon Fraser University
Conference: 
Changing the Culture 2011
Abstract: 
Who do your students think their homework is for? Does attaching credit to homework promote student understanding, or encourage students to find answers by whatever means necessary? Are they focused on calculating the answer, or seeing the big picture? Is their homework grade a true reflection of their own understanding of the material, or does it better reflect the understanding of their "support network"? In this workshop we will describe our efforts to improve student feedback and to promote good study skills in first and second year mathematics classes.

Raising the Floor and Lifting the Ceiling: Math For All

Speaker: 
Sharon Friesen
Date: 
Fri, Apr 29, 2011
Location: 
SFU Harbour Center
Location: 
PIMS, Simon Fraser University
Conference: 
Changing the Culture 2011
Abstract: 
"Math. The bane of my existence for as many years as I can count. I cannot relate it to my life or become interested in what I'm learning. I find it boring and cannot find any way to apply myself to it since I rarely understand it." (high school student) Today, mathematics education faces two major challenges: raising the floor by expanding achievement for all, and lifting the ceiling of achievement to better prepare future leaders in mathematics, as well as in science, engineering, and technology. At first glance, these appear to be mutually exclusive: But are they? Is it possible to design learning that engages the vast majority of students in higher mathematics learning? In this presentation, I will present the findings and discuss the implications from a research study that explored the ways to teach mathematics that both raised the floor and lifted the ceiling.
Syndicate content