Mathematics

Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course Lecture 27

Speaker: 
William Holmes
Date: 
Thu, May 17, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
  • Local Pulse Analysis for RD equations
  • Actin Waves
  • Matlab examples and exercises

Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course Lecture 26

Speaker: 
William Holmes
Date: 
Wed, May 16, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
  • Local Pulse Analysis for RD equations
  • Actin Waves
  • Matlab examples and exercises

Diffusion, Reaction, and Biological pattern formation (continued 3 of 3)

Speaker: 
Leah Edelstein-Keshet
Date: 
Wed, May 16, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
Here I return the pattern-formation discussion to the context of symmetry breaking and chemical patterns of GTPases such as Cdc42, Rac and Rho in cell polarization. I explain the spatial context of GTPase distributions in a stimulated chemotactic cell and derive the system of partial differential equations (PDEs) for these. These examples motivate the usefulness of LPA as an additional tool in testing for pattern formation and polarizability.

Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course Lecture 24

Speaker: 
Raibatak (Dodo) Das
Date: 
Wed, May 16, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
Data Analysis Methods

Pattern Formation of Proteins on the Surface of a Biological Cell

Speaker: 
Cory Simon
Date: 
Fri, May 4, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
This is a brief summary of a collaborative project with William Bement on patterns of Cdc42 and Rho that arise when the surface of a cell (frog egg, Xenopus oocyte) is wounded. Based on experimental observations and previous discoveries about proteins such as Abr (a GEF/GAP that activates Rho and inactivates Cdc42) were were able to derive a model that captures aspects the phenomena. The model, in turn, inspired several new experiments, notably those where wounds in close proximity were studied. The observed patterns of overlap of influence from neighbouring wounds can be explained by the model.

Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course Lecture 23

Speaker: 
William Holmes
Date: 
Tue, May 15, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
  • Local Pulse Analysis for RD equations
  • Actin Waves
  • Matlab examples and exercises

Diffusion, Reaction, and Biological pattern formation (continued 2 of 3)

Speaker: 
Leah Edelstein-Keshet
Date: 
Tue, May 15, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
We first consider the topic of biological patterns and then place it in the context of developmental biology and positional information. The example of the fruit fly (Drosophilla) development is used to motivate the basic questions. We next consider how chemical interaction coupled to diffusion can give rise to pattern formation. We discuss Turing's (1952) theory for pattern formation and derive the conditions for this to happen in a system of two interacting chemicals. Returning to the fruit-fly example, we observe that the mechanism for development (based on reading the level of bicoid protein) has been shown to be distinct from a Turing pattern

Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course Lecture 21

Speaker: 
Raibatak (Dodo) Das
Date: 
Tue, May 15, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
Data Analysis Methods

Diffusion, Reaction, and Biological pattern formation

Speaker: 
Leah Edelstein-Keshet
Date: 
Mon, May 14, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
We first consider the topic of biological patterns and then place it in the context of developmental biology and positional information. The example of the fruit fly (Drosophilla) development is used to motivate the basic questions. We next consider how chemical interaction coupled to diffusion can give rise to pattern formation. We discuss Turing's (1952) theory for pattern formation and derive the conditions for this to happen in a system of two interacting chemicals. Returning to the fruit-fly example, we observe that the mechanism for development (based on reading the level of bicoid protein) has been shown to be distinct from a Turing pattern

Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course Lecture 19

Speaker: 
Raibatak (Dodo) Das
Date: 
Mon, May 14, 2012
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Cell Biology Summer Course
Abstract: 
Data Analysis Methods
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