Mathematics

Algebraic Stacks and the Inertia Operator

Speaker: 
Kai Behrend
Date: 
Fri, Mar 27, 2015
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
CRM-Fields-PIMS Prize Lecture
Abstract: 

Motivated by subtle questions in Donaldson-Thomas theory, we study the spectrum of the inertia operator on the Grothendieck module of algebraic stacks. We hope to give an idea of what this statement means.  Along the way, we encounter some elementary, but apparently new, questions about finite groups and matrix groups.  Prerequisites for this talk: a little linear algebra, and a little group theory. 

 

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Projecting the Uncertainty of Sea Level Rise Using Climate Models and Statistical Downscaling

Speaker: 
Peter Guttorp
Date: 
Tue, Mar 24, 2015
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Constance van Eeden Invited Speaker, UBC Statistics Department
Abstract: 

Most global climate models do not estimate sea level directly. A semi-empirical approach is to relate sea level change to temperature and then apply this relationship to climate model projections of temperature for different future scenarios. Another possibility is to estimate the relationship between global mean temperature in historical runs of a model and instead apply this relationship to future temperature projections. We compare these two methods to estimate global annual mean sea level and assess the resulting uncertainty. Of more practical importance is to estimate local sea level. We exemplify this by developing models for projected sea level rise in Vancouver and Washington State and illustrate different sources of uncertainty in the projections.

 

BIO: Peter Guttorp is a Professor of Statistics, Guest Professor at the Norwegian Computing Center, Project Leader for SARMA, the Nordic Network on Statistical Approaches to Regional Climate Models for Adaptation, Co-director of STATMOS, the Research Network on Statistical Methods for Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, Adjunct Professor of Statistics at Simon Fraser University and member of the interdisciplinary faculties in Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management and Urban Design and Planning. He obtained a degree from the Stockholm School of Journalism in 1969, a B.S. in mathematics, mathematical statistics and musicology from Lund University, Sweden, in 1974, a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1980 and a Tech.D. h.c. from Lund University in 2009. He joined the University of Washington faculty in September 1980.

Dr. Guttorp’s research interests include uses of stochastic models in scientific applications in hydrology, atmospheric science, geophysics, environmental science, and hematology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. During 2004-2005 he was the Environmental Research Professor of the Swedish Institute of Graduate Engineers, and in 2014 he was one of the Chalmers Jubilee Professors.

Algebraic groups and maximal tori

Speaker: 
Vladimir Chernousov
Date: 
Mon, Mar 23, 2015
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Geometry and Physics Seminar
Abstract: 

We will survey recent developments dealing with characterization of absolutely almost simple algebraic groups having the same isomorphism/isogeny classes of maximal tori over the field of definition. These questions arose in the analysis of weakly commensurable Zariski-dense subgroups. While there are definitive  results over number fields (which we will briefly review), the  theory over general fields is only emerging. We will formulate the  existing conjectures, outline their potential applications, and  report on recent progress. Joint work with A. Rapinchuk and  I. Rapinchuk.

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Mirror Symmetry and the Classification of Fano Manifolds

Speaker: 
Tom Coates
Date: 
Mon, Mar 16, 2015
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Geometry and Physics Seminar
Abstract: 

TBA

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Adam Clay Lecture 1 of 2

Speaker: 
Adam Clay
Date: 
Mon, Feb 23, 2015
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Abstract: 

This lecture is part of a course organized by Dale Rolfsen.

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The Mathematics of Lattice-based Cryptography

Speaker: 
Jill Pipher
Date: 
Fri, Mar 13, 2015
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Abstract: 

TBA

Adam Clay Lecture 2 of 2

Speaker: 
Adam Clay
Date: 
Tue, Feb 24, 2015
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Abstract: 

This lecture is part of a course organized by Dale Rolfsen.

Economies with Financial Frictions: A Continuous Time Approach 3

Speaker: 
Yuliy Sannikov
Date: 
Fri, Jul 25, 2014
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
The Economics and Mathematics of Systemic Risk and Financial Networks
Abstract: 

The recent financial crisis has made obvious the need for models of financial stability. These three lectures will cover recent advancements in the modeling of crisis episodes, with particular emphasis on the use of continuous-time methods which make these models more tractable. Useful background reading includes the following

Economies with Financial Frictions: A Continuous Time Approach 2

Speaker: 
Yuliy Sannikov
Date: 
Thu, Jul 24, 2014
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
The Economics and Mathematics of Systemic Risk and Financial Networks
Abstract: 

The recent financial crisis has made obvious the need for models of financial stability. These three lectures will cover recent advancements in the modeling of crisis episodes, with particular emphasis on the use of continuous-time methods which make these models more tractable. Useful background reading includes the following

Economies with Financial Frictions: A Continuous Time Approach

Speaker: 
Yuliy Sannikov
Date: 
Wed, Jul 23, 2014
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
The Economics and Mathematics of Systemic Risk and Financial Networks
Abstract: 

The recent financial crisis has made obvious the need for models of financial stability. These three lectures will cover recent advancements in the modeling of crisis episodes, with particular emphasis on the use of continuous-time methods which make these models more tractable. Useful background reading includes the following

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