Applied Mathematics

Memory Induced Animal Movement Patterns

Speaker: 
Ulrike Schlaegel
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 

This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

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Min Protein Patter Formation

Speaker: 
William Carlquist
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
IGTC Summit
Abstract: 

This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

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Virtual Lung Project at UNC: What's Math Got To Do With It?

Speaker: 
Gregory Forest
Date: 
Fri, Mar 18, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Abstract: 

A group of scientists at the University of North Carolina, from theorists to clinicians, have coalesced over the past decade on an effort called the Virtual Lung Project. There is a parallel VLP at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, focused on environmental health, but I will focus on our effort. We come from mathematics, chemistry, computer science, physics, lung biology, biophysics and medicine. The goal is to engineer lung health through combined experimental-theoretical-computational tools to measure, assess, and predict lung function and dysfunction. Now one might ask, with all due respect to Tina Turner: what's math got to do with it? My lecture is devoted to many responses, including some progress yet more open problems.

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Introduction to Marsden & Symmetry

Speaker: 
Alan Weinstein
Date: 
Wed, Jul 20, 2011
Location: 
Vancouver Convention Center, BC, Canada
Conference: 
ICIAM 2011
Abstract: 

Alan Weinstein is a Professor of the Graduate School in the Department of Mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley. He was a colleague of Jerry Marsden throughout Jerry’s career at Berkeley, and their joint papers on “Reduction of symplectic manifolds with symmetry” and “The Hamiltonian structure of the Maxwell-Vlasov equations” were fundamental contributions to geometric mechanics.

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Warming Caused by Cumulative Carbon Emissions: the Trillionth Tonne

Speaker: 
Myles Allen
Date: 
Wed, Aug 8, 2007 to Thu, Aug 9, 2007
Location: 
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Conference: 
1st PRIMA Congress
Abstract: 

The eventual equilibrium global mean temperature associated with a given stabilization level of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations remains uncertain, complicating the setting of stabilization targets to avoid potentially dangerous levels of global warming. Similar problems apply to the carbon cycle: observations currently provide only a weak constraint on the response to future emissions. These present fundamental challenges for the statistical community, since the non-linear relationship between quantities we can observe and the response to a stabilization scenario makes estimates of the risks associated with any stabilization target acutely sensitive to the details of the analysis, prior selection etc. Here we use ensemble simulations of simple climate-carbon-cycle models constrained by observations and projections from more comprehensive models to simulate the temperature response to a broad range of carbon dioxide emission pathways. We find that the peak warming caused by a given cumulative carbon dioxide emission is better constrained than the warming response to a stabilization scenario and hence less sensitive to underdetermined aspects of the analysis. Furthermore, the relationship between cumulative emissions and peak warming is remarkably insensitive to the emission pathway (timing of emissions or peak emission rate). Hence policy targets based on limiting cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide are likely to be more robust to scientific uncertainty than emission-rate or concentration targets. Total anthropogenic emissions of one trillion tonnes of carbon (3.67 trillion tonnes of CO2), about half of which has already been emitted since industrialization began, results in a most likely peak carbon-dioxide induced warming of 2○C above pre-industrial temperatures, with a 5-95% confidence interval of 1.3-3.9○C.

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Discrete Stochastic Simulation of Spatially Inhomogeneous Biochemical Systems

Speaker: 
Linda Petzold
Date: 
Tue, Jul 7, 2009
Location: 
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Conference: 
1st PRIMA Congress
Abstract: 

In microscopic systems formed by living cells, the small numbers of some reactant molecules can result in dynamical behavior that is discrete and stochastic rather than continuous and deterministic. An analysis tool that respects these dynamical characteristics is the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA), which applies to well-stirred chemically reacting systems. However, cells are hardly homogeneous! Spatio-temporal gradients and patterns play an important role in many biochemical processes. In this lecture we report on recent progress in the development of methods for spatial stochastic and multiscale simulation, and outline some of the many interesting complications that arise in the modeling and simulation of spatially inhomogeneous biochemical systems.

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