Mathematics

Floer Homology Applications 3

Speaker: 
Jeff Hicks
Date: 
Fri, Jul 22, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia, Zoom, Online
Conference: 
Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory
Abstract: 

A lecture titled "Floer Homology Applications" by Jeff Hicks, University of Edinburgh. This is the 3rd in a series of 3.

General Description:
The idea of stable homotopy refinements of Floer homology was first introduced by Cohen, Jones, and Segal in a 1994 paper, but it was only in the last decade that this idea became a key tool in low-dimensional and symplectic topology. The two crowning achievements of these techniques so far are Manolescu's use of his Pin(2)-equivariant Seiberg–Witten Floer homotopy type to resolve the Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg's use of Floer homotopy theory and Morava K-theory to prove the general Arnol'd Conjecture in finite characteristic. During this period, a range of related techniques, included under the umbrella of Floer homotopy theory, have also led to important advances, including involutive Heegaard Floer homology, Smith theory for Lagrangian intersections, homotopy coherence, and further connections between string topology and Floer theory. These in turn have sparked developments in algebraic topology, ranging from developments on Lie algebras in derived algebraic geometry to new computations of equivariant Mahowald invariants to new results on topological Hochschild homology.

The goal of the summer school is to provide participants the tools in symplectic geometry and stable homotopy theory required to work on Floer homotopy theory. Students will come away with a basic understanding of some of the key techniques, questions, and challenges in both of these fields. The summer school may be particularly valuable for participants with a solid understanding of one of the two fields who want to learn more about the other and the connections between them.

Class: 
Subject: 

Spectra and Smash Products 4

Speaker: 
Cary Malkiewich
Date: 
Fri, Jul 22, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia, Zoom, Online
Conference: 
Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory
Abstract: 

A lecture titled "Spectra and Smash Products" by Cary Malkiewich, Binghamton University. This is the 4th in a series of 4.

General Description:
The idea of stable homotopy refinements of Floer homology was first introduced by Cohen, Jones, and Segal in a 1994 paper, but it was only in the last decade that this idea became a key tool in low-dimensional and symplectic topology. The two crowning achievements of these techniques so far are Manolescu's use of his Pin(2)-equivariant Seiberg–Witten Floer homotopy type to resolve the Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg's use of Floer homotopy theory and Morava K-theory to prove the general Arnol'd Conjecture in finite characteristic. During this period, a range of related techniques, included under the umbrella of Floer homotopy theory, have also led to important advances, including involutive Heegaard Floer homology, Smith theory for Lagrangian intersections, homotopy coherence, and further connections between string topology and Floer theory. These in turn have sparked developments in algebraic topology, ranging from developments on Lie algebras in derived algebraic geometry to new computations of equivariant Mahowald invariants to new results on topological Hochschild homology.

The goal of the summer school is to provide participants the tools in symplectic geometry and stable homotopy theory required to work on Floer homotopy theory. Students will come away with a basic understanding of some of the key techniques, questions, and challenges in both of these fields. The summer school may be particularly valuable for participants with a solid understanding of one of the two fields who want to learn more about the other and the connections between them.

Class: 
Subject: 

Floer Homology Fundamentals 5

Speaker: 
Catherine Cannizzo
Date: 
Wed, Jul 13, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia, Zoom, Online
Conference: 
Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory
Abstract: 

A lecture titled "Floer Homology Fundamentals" by Catherine Cannizzo, SCGP. This is the 5th in a series of 9.

General Description:
The idea of stable homotopy refinements of Floer homology was first introduced by Cohen, Jones, and Segal in a 1994 paper, but it was only in the last decade that this idea became a key tool in low-dimensional and symplectic topology. The two crowning achievements of these techniques so far are Manolescu's use of his Pin(2)-equivariant Seiberg–Witten Floer homotopy type to resolve the Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg's use of Floer homotopy theory and Morava K-theory to prove the general Arnol'd Conjecture in finite characteristic. During this period, a range of related techniques, included under the umbrella of Floer homotopy theory, have also led to important advances, including involutive Heegaard Floer homology, Smith theory for Lagrangian intersections, homotopy coherence, and further connections between string topology and Floer theory. These in turn have sparked developments in algebraic topology, ranging from developments on Lie algebras in derived algebraic geometry to new computations of equivariant Mahowald invariants to new results on topological Hochschild homology.

The goal of the summer school is to provide participants the tools in symplectic geometry and stable homotopy theory required to work on Floer homotopy theory. Students will come away with a basic understanding of some of the key techniques, questions, and challenges in both of these fields. The summer school may be particularly valuable for participants with a solid understanding of one of the two fields who want to learn more about the other and the connections between them.

Class: 
Subject: 

String Topology 1

Speaker: 
Katherine Poirier
Date: 
Tue, Jul 12, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia, Zoom, Online
Conference: 
Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory
Abstract: 

A lecture titled "String Topology" by Katherine Poirier, New York City College of Technology. This is the 1st in a series of 3.

General Description:
The idea of stable homotopy refinements of Floer homology was first introduced by Cohen, Jones, and Segal in a 1994 paper, but it was only in the last decade that this idea became a key tool in low-dimensional and symplectic topology. The two crowning achievements of these techniques so far are Manolescu's use of his Pin(2)-equivariant Seiberg–Witten Floer homotopy type to resolve the Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg's use of Floer homotopy theory and Morava K-theory to prove the general Arnol'd Conjecture in finite characteristic. During this period, a range of related techniques, included under the umbrella of Floer homotopy theory, have also led to important advances, including involutive Heegaard Floer homology, Smith theory for Lagrangian intersections, homotopy coherence, and further connections between string topology and Floer theory. These in turn have sparked developments in algebraic topology, ranging from developments on Lie algebras in derived algebraic geometry to new computations of equivariant Mahowald invariants to new results on topological Hochschild homology.

The goal of the summer school is to provide participants the tools in symplectic geometry and stable homotopy theory required to work on Floer homotopy theory. Students will come away with a basic understanding of some of the key techniques, questions, and challenges in both of these fields. The summer school may be particularly valuable for participants with a solid understanding of one of the two fields who want to learn more about the other and the connections between them.

Class: 
Subject: 

Floer Homology Fundamentals 3

Speaker: 
Catherine Cannizzo
Date: 
Tue, Jul 12, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia, Zoom, Online
Conference: 
Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory
Abstract: 

A lecture titled "Floer Homology Fundamentals" by Catherine Cannizzo, SCGP. This is the 3rd in a series of 9.

General Description:
The idea of stable homotopy refinements of Floer homology was first introduced by Cohen, Jones, and Segal in a 1994 paper, but it was only in the last decade that this idea became a key tool in low-dimensional and symplectic topology. The two crowning achievements of these techniques so far are Manolescu's use of his Pin(2)-equivariant Seiberg–Witten Floer homotopy type to resolve the Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg's use of Floer homotopy theory and Morava K-theory to prove the general Arnol'd Conjecture in finite characteristic. During this period, a range of related techniques, included under the umbrella of Floer homotopy theory, have also led to important advances, including involutive Heegaard Floer homology, Smith theory for Lagrangian intersections, homotopy coherence, and further connections between string topology and Floer theory. These in turn have sparked developments in algebraic topology, ranging from developments on Lie algebras in derived algebraic geometry to new computations of equivariant Mahowald invariants to new results on topological Hochschild homology.

The goal of the summer school is to provide participants the tools in symplectic geometry and stable homotopy theory required to work on Floer homotopy theory. Students will come away with a basic understanding of some of the key techniques, questions, and challenges in both of these fields. The summer school may be particularly valuable for participants with a solid understanding of one of the two fields who want to learn more about the other and the connections between them.

Class: 
Subject: 

The equivalence of the Ekeland-Hofer and equivariant symplectic homology capacities

Speaker: 
Vinicius G. B. Ramos
Date: 
Thu, Jul 21, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia, Zoom, Online
Conference: 
Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory
Abstract: 

The Ekeland-Hofer capacities are some of the earliest symplectic capacities. They were defined without Floer theory and their calculation for ellipsoids and polydisks laid the foundation for the understanding of symplectic embeddings for a long time. More recently, Gutt and Hutchings defined a sequence of capacities using positive S^1 equivariant symplectic homology, which are harder to define, but much easier to compute. In this talk, I will explain how there is an isomorphism from the Hamiltonian Floer homology of a class of Hamiltonians to its H^{1/2}-Morse homology and how this implies that those two sequences of capacities coincide. This is joint work with J. Gutt.

Class: 
Subject: 

Floer Homology Applications 2

Speaker: 
Jeff Hicks
Date: 
Thu, Jul 21, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia, Zoom, Online
Conference: 
Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory
Abstract: 

A lecture titled "Floer Homology Applications" by Jeff Hicks, University of Edinburgh. This is the 2nd in a series of 3.

General Description:
The idea of stable homotopy refinements of Floer homology was first introduced by Cohen, Jones, and Segal in a 1994 paper, but it was only in the last decade that this idea became a key tool in low-dimensional and symplectic topology. The two crowning achievements of these techniques so far are Manolescu's use of his Pin(2)-equivariant Seiberg–Witten Floer homotopy type to resolve the Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg's use of Floer homotopy theory and Morava K-theory to prove the general Arnol'd Conjecture in finite characteristic. During this period, a range of related techniques, included under the umbrella of Floer homotopy theory, have also led to important advances, including involutive Heegaard Floer homology, Smith theory for Lagrangian intersections, homotopy coherence, and further connections between string topology and Floer theory. These in turn have sparked developments in algebraic topology, ranging from developments on Lie algebras in derived algebraic geometry to new computations of equivariant Mahowald invariants to new results on topological Hochschild homology.

The goal of the summer school is to provide participants the tools in symplectic geometry and stable homotopy theory required to work on Floer homotopy theory. Students will come away with a basic understanding of some of the key techniques, questions, and challenges in both of these fields. The summer school may be particularly valuable for participants with a solid understanding of one of the two fields who want to learn more about the other and the connections between them.

Class: 
Subject: 

Spectra and Smash Products 3

Speaker: 
Cary Malkiewich
Date: 
Thu, Jul 21, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia, Zoom, Online
Conference: 
Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2022: Floer Homotopy Theory
Abstract: 

A lecture titled "Spectra and Smash Products" by Cary Malkiewich, Binghamton University. This is the 3rd in a series of 4.

General Description:
The idea of stable homotopy refinements of Floer homology was first introduced by Cohen, Jones, and Segal in a 1994 paper, but it was only in the last decade that this idea became a key tool in low-dimensional and symplectic topology. The two crowning achievements of these techniques so far are Manolescu's use of his Pin(2)-equivariant Seiberg–Witten Floer homotopy type to resolve the Triangulation Conjecture and Abouzaid-Blumberg's use of Floer homotopy theory and Morava K-theory to prove the general Arnol'd Conjecture in finite characteristic. During this period, a range of related techniques, included under the umbrella of Floer homotopy theory, have also led to important advances, including involutive Heegaard Floer homology, Smith theory for Lagrangian intersections, homotopy coherence, and further connections between string topology and Floer theory. These in turn have sparked developments in algebraic topology, ranging from developments on Lie algebras in derived algebraic geometry to new computations of equivariant Mahowald invariants to new results on topological Hochschild homology.

The goal of the summer school is to provide participants the tools in symplectic geometry and stable homotopy theory required to work on Floer homotopy theory. Students will come away with a basic understanding of some of the key techniques, questions, and challenges in both of these fields. The summer school may be particularly valuable for participants with a solid understanding of one of the two fields who want to learn more about the other and the connections between them.

Class: 
Subject: 

Moments of the Hurwitz zeta function

Speaker: 
Anurag Sahay
Date: 
Fri, Jul 29, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of Northern British Columbia
Conference: 
Moments of L-functions Workshop
Abstract: 

The Hurwitz zeta function is a shifted integer analogue of the Riemann zeta function, for shift parameters $0<\alpha\leqslant 1$. We consider the integral moments of the Hurwitz zeta function on the critical line $\Re(s)=\frac12$. We focus on rational $\alpha$. In this case, the Hurwitz zeta function decomposes as a linear combination of Dirichlet $L$-functions, which leads us into investigating moments of products of $L$-functions. Using heuristics from random matrix theory, we conjecture an asymptotic of the same form as the moments of the Riemann zeta function. If time permits, we will discuss the case of irrational shift parameters $\alpha$, which will include some joint work with Winston Heap and Trevor Wooley and some ongoing work with Heap.

Class: 

An extension of Venkatesh's converse theorem to the Selberg class

Speaker: 
Min Lee
Date: 
Fri, Jul 29, 2022
Location: 
PIMS, University of Northern British Columbia
Conference: 
Moments of L-functions Workshop
Abstract: 

In his thesis, Venkatesh gave a new proof of the classical converse theorem for modular forms of level~$1$ in the context of Langlands' ``Beyond Endoscopy". We extend his approach to arbitrary levels and characters. The method of proof, via the Petersson trace formula, allows us to treat arbitrary degree~$2$ gamma factors of Selberg class type.
This is joint work with Andrew R. Booker and Michael Farmer.

Class: 

Pages